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Nam Ton Watershed

Knowledge Platform

Earthen ponds are common throughout Hin Herb and Sangthong Districts. Some have been constructed from scratch whereas others represent modified swampy areas. Some are comparatively large (up to around 0.2 to 0.3ha in surface area). Without proper management, or where it is not considered to be economically viable to introduce management techniques, many earthen ponds do not reach their optimum productivity in terms of economic returns.

The green slight green tinge on the water surface means that this fish pond has some potential for production. The greener the better, but economics are involved. B. Paunkham, Sangthong District, Dece
A series of dammed paddy fields to create fish ponds in a valley. Photo taken in Xieng Khouang Province in 2009. Ponds extend above and below this one
An example of rearing Clarius sp. catfish in a cement tank under a house. Photo taken in a village along the Nam Ou in 2010
An integrated pig-fish system. The waste pig food and dung from the livestock unit enters the pond to stimulate primary production and supplemental food for fish production. Photo taken along the Nam
A series of dammed paddy fields to create fish ponds in a valley. Photo taken in Xieng Khouang Province in 2009. Ponds extend above and below this one
The culture of frogs on an integrated farm in Northern Lao P.D.R. Photo taken in 2008
A hatchery tank at the km52 fish breeding center between the NTPA and Vientiane. This is an approximate example of what could be built in Sangthong and Hin Herb Districts. Photo taken in December 2011

 

Small water bodies

Purpose-built hatcheries and associated nursery and brood-stock ponds built at strategic sites to 1) act as “local” sources of fry for Hin Herb and Sangthong Districts 2) act as centers to hold seminars on fish breeding and nursery techniques for fisher-farmers 3) act as demonstration sites and literature dissemination points to promote all aspects of fish culture and pond management best practices.

Introduce methods of fish fry propagation for individual farmers to adopt on their own farms (limited number of species).

Introduce methods of nursing fry so that they reach a size suitable for stocking in ponds or in other culture environments.

Introduce “fish handling” techniques from fry and fingerling sizes up to adult fish.

Introduce techniques such as “green” manuring and lime application.

Introduce methods of predator control, particularly predatory fish.

Introduce the concepts of identifying and collecting on-farm feeds where these are available and can be collected on a regular basis.